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During the crawling stage or “earthquake” stage

In this phase the baby´s foot is not fully formed. Their bones are soft and flexible, like cartilage and the arch of the foot is not yet defined.

(7 months)

During this stage, footwear that promotes motor development, muscle tone acquisition, and sensitivity as if the baby is barefoot is needed.

BARE FOOT
SENSATION

100% MOVEMENT FREEDOM
0% INTERFERENCE
Long lasting Velcro, so that the shoe is easier to fit.
Removable antibacterial insole.
100% natural, breathable leather.
Light, flexible sole that covers the toe and heel to provide grip and help with movement.

During the support stage or “ I reach everything” stage

The majority of the bones in the foot begin to harden, forming the structure of the adult foot. But, be careful! The foot is still not fully formed.

(10 months)

To strengthen their muscles and keep their feet from losing shape or bending excessively, babies need footwear that protects them without being too tight on the foot, with a light and flexible sole so that they can feel where they are stepping.

BARE FOOT
SENSATION

100% MOVEMENT FREEDOM
0% INTERFERENCE
100% natural, breathable leather.
Reinforcement in the toe and heel to provide protection to their joints and free of stabilisers that interfere with their natural balance.
Light, flexible sole that covers the toe and heel to provide grip and help with movement.
Removable antibacterial insole.

During the first steps stage or “By myself” stage

Their feet don't stop growing! But they are not yet fully formed. That's why it is very important that their bones are allowed to develop naturally.

(12 months)

This is why, the straps of the shoe should be able to adapt to the shape of the top of the foot. This will allow for the correct distribution of the baby’s bodyweight while walking. Their shoes need an anatomical insole and reinforcement in the toe and heel to help babies when they begin walking alone.

BARE FOOT
SENSATION

100% MOVEMENT FREEDOM
0% INTERFERENCE
100% natural, breathable leather.
Seamless lining.
Long lasting, so that the shoe is easier to fit
Antibacterial absorbent insole.
Flexible, non-slip rubber sole.
Physiological last. The only one that contributes to the foot's correct development.

EXPERT
ADVICE

Familiarise yourself with the benefits of our footwear which is created by our experts with the physiology of your baby’s feet in mind.

The feet should be cleaned with warm water and a neutral soap,dry the entire foot carefully (both the top and the sole) and take special care with the space between each toe. As the toes are very small, we must prevent the water from getting that area too wet. Moisturising creams or lotions should not be applied to the feet, and changes in colour or texture must be monitored.

In the event of foot odours, the frequency of washing should be increased, and socks made from natural fibres should be used (cotton or natural yarns) with footwear made of leather or breathable fabrics. At these ages, it is not recommended to use deodorants or drying substances.

Cut the ends of nails with cuticle scissors as straight as possible. For areas that are hard to get at, you can use a nail file instead of cuticle scissors.
Piedad Trujillo.
Children's shoe commission.
SEBIOR Vice President.
We must note some of the features of ideal footwear, or physiological footwear (as it is known in the podiatry and healthcare worlds), that are common to all developmental stages: natural materials, breathable, and/or quality technical materials. Shoes should have a physiological form, good fit to the foot, and provide stability without corrective elements. There should be flexibility in the area around the front of foot and the soles should have enough grip and cushioning while not being excessively thick. There should be zero difference in height between the heel and the front of the shoe. There should also be minimal seams on the inside, a stable back that does not limit the joint mobility of the foot and ankle, and it is recommendable to have a removable insole.

We also must remember that children should not wear shoes until they start to crawl, and they should have a specific shoe for crawling. In those first months, socks or very flexible, lightweight baby booties should be worn with the sole aim of protecting the skin and protecting from the cold. Subsequently, in the crawling and pre-walking stage, we should opt for light footwear with reinforcement in the toe; it should be quite flexible and allow for the free movement of the foot and ankle joints, wide in the toe area, and have a minimal sole thickness to help with proprioception. There should not be inner seams.

From the time when the first steps and walking begin, the footwear should have a heel counter that doesn't extend too far from side to side and that doesn't compromise the Achilles tendon insertion; that is to say, a low heel counter. And, of course, the common features mentioned before are still important. Beginning when the child starts to move about independently with a certain degree of stability, certain orthopaedic treatments could be applied, like support for the bottom of the foot (custom insoles) for cases with podological alterations or pathologies of a certain degree of severity and in which early action is important to resolve the problem, with medical advice. At these ages --around two or three years-- it is very important for the footwear to have a removable insole and for it to be designed based on physiology to be able to take good care of the foot without having to turn to orthopaedic or custom shoes, which are currently only used for very complex abnormalities and specific cases. Of course, it is not a good idea to use an older sibling's shoes or shoes that belonged to another family member.
José Manuel Castillo.
SEBIOR President.
When the baby is first learning to walk, it is difficult stage to assess. The important thing is for the baby to be able to stand – first with help and then independently. A good sign is if the baby has passed through all the (normal) physiological stages until learning to walk: creeping, crawling, an upright position (first with help and then alone), assisted walking, and walking. It is possible, and not indicative of any problem, if one of these stages is skipped. It is very important to not use elements or aids that speed up walking (for example, baby walkers and similar devices). The child, under normal conditions, will walk with a certain degree of independence between 12 and 18 months, although in some cases this can be delayed a bit.

Unless a clear abnormality is present in the foot or the legs, or if there is a significant delay in starting to walk or frequent falls, you shouldn't be alarmed. If you have any questions, you can always ask your podiatrist or physiotherapist.
Salvador González.
Children's shoe commission.
SEBIOR Treasurer.
Small children normally have a physiological flattening of the plantar arch (until 3-4 years) which is visible when babies stand, or in their footprint. Additionally, the fat on the bottom of the foot brings about a noticeable "flattened" aspect in infants. It is more important at this age to take notice of other signs, such as: tiredness when walking, frequent falls, foot or toe deformities, and problems with the feet or with walking (excessive turning of the foot or walking with the feet rolling inward or outward). A foot that appears to be flat does not, under any circumstance, mean an inverted or convex sole – that is a probable sign of a congenital disorder (something that is already apparent at birth) known as convex flat feet or vertical talus. If in doubt, ask your podiatrist or physiotherapist.
Piedad Trujillo.
Children's shoe commission.
SEBIOR Secretary.
In infants, socks or baby booties should be worn exclusively for protection. Specific footwear should be used in the pre-walking stages (creeping and crawling) – not before. In any case, footwear should have the features mentioned before and it should be as close as possible to not wearing shoes. This is so that the baby can take advantage of all the sensory input that children get from the environment through their feet. This information is very important for proper neurological and musculoskeletal system development and, therefore, for learning to walk. Footwear, in its classic sense, should be worn from the time when the child walks and be designed to adapt to the features, needs, and tasks of the foot at each stage of growth.
Piedad Trujillo.
Children's shoe commission.
SEBIOR Vice President.
El calzado infantil no debe incluir puente anatómico, o al menos prominente. Debe permitir que el pie se desarrolle, en su estructura y morfología, de manera natural y progresiva. El puente anatómico puede ser un estímulo útil para pies con determinados problemas, pero también contraproducente en otros casos.

Por ello, como norma, en el calzado infantil no se recomienda, aunque, como he comentado, depende de su grosor, forma y densidad. El término “anatómico” no parece muy correcto en este caso. El pie es una estructura en forma de bóveda que a partir de los 3 años debe empezar a ser evidente en la parte interna.

A medida que el niño crece, aumenta el arco interno y se forma el hueco del “puente”. Éste debe ya observarse con 5 años y debe estabilizarse sobre los 8-10.
Inmaculada Concepción Palomo.
Comisión calzado infantil SEBIOR
A removable insole is an added advantage in children's shoes from the time they take their first steps. As we have said previously, beginning at 2-3 years of age, there are many children that require the use of orthotics (custom insoles); therefore, this removable element with a certain thickness (at least 2 mm) allows for custom supports to be inserted into mass-produced footwear – provided this footwear meets the requirements for physiological, or ideal, footwear.
Piedad Trujillo.
Children's shoe commission.
SEBIOR Secretary.
Free movement is fundamental and essential – especially in the child's early stages. This is due to the fact that the small muscles in the foot and the balance system mature as the foot and ankle become more mobile, acquiring their full range of motion, receiving stimuli from the ground, the sole, and other parts of the shoe and from the external environment. Muscle strength, which is acquired gradually, helps the arch to form and it aids in proper positioning and alignment of the heel.
Inmaculada Concepción Palomo.
Comisión calzado
infantil de SEBIOR
This is a form for the shoe that meets the morphological and functional characteristics of the foot. That is to say, the shoe fits the foot precisely and three-dimensionally: in terms of length, width, and height of the foot and in every stage of the child's development and growth. Additionally, a proper form should respect the lengthwise alignment of the foot. For children's shoes, forms that curve inwards should be avoided. This type of form is used in certain shoes for aesthetics; but it can bring about injuries or abnormalities in the toes from rubbing or pressure. Inverted forms (curving outwards) are also not recommendable under any circumstances.
José Manuel Castillo.
SEBIOR President.
All exercises that stimulate intrinsic foot musculature are positive for proper foot development – from strokes or “tickling” the baby´s feet and walking barefoot or on safe surfaces (sand, grass, level floors) to picking up things like pencils or towels with the toes. From four or five years of age and in pre-teens and older children, participation in any sporting activity is always beneficial – if it is regulated and under the guidance of sport professionals, that is even better. In the event of foot pathologies, and often in addition to treatment with custom insoles, your podiatrist may recommend a specific sport activity or exercises to strengthen or improve certain muscle groups.
Salvador González.
Children's shoe commission.
SEBIOR Treasurer.